How Do I Get a Copy of a Quitclaim Deed?

Posted by CourthouseDirect.com Team - 17 May, 2017

header-picture

quitclaim-deed

A quitclaim deed transfers interest in real property from one entity (the grantor) to another (the grantee). Unlike most property deeds, quitclaim deeds do not contain a title covenant – thus they offer the grantee no guarantee as to the status of the property’s title. If the grantor does not actually own the property, the grantee may receive no actual interest, and no legal recourse to recover losses. Typically, quitclaim deeds are used between friends or family members. You may need a copy of a quitclaim deed as a grantor or grantee to prove the status of a piece of property. Here are two ways to obtain a copy.

Visit Your County Recorder’s Office

Quitclaim deeds are part of public record. This means anyone who wants a copy can obtain one. One way to get a copy of this type of deed is to visit your local county recorder’s office. If you don’t know where this is, simply Google search “County Clerk” followed by the name of the county where the property exists. The office is typically in a courthouse. The county clerk’s office contains copies of public records such as marriage licenses, birth and death records, and property deeds.

Sign up for CourthouseDirect.com to access deed records »

Each county recorder’s office has a different process for searching for deeds. Call ahead and ask about your county’s particular requirements. Some offices may give you this information over the phone, and allow you to request a copy of the quitclaim deed by mail. Others may accept requests online. To search for a quitclaim deed, you’ll need either the last name of the grantor or the grantee.

If you have to go to the county clerk’s office, come prepared with the last name, the property’s address, and the parcel’s identification or tax identification number, if possible. Knowing when the original quitclaim deed was recorded may also help. The more information you have, the easier your county clerk’s office search will be. The clerk will locate the deed in the index (a process that can take hours or even days) and give you a certified copy for a small fee. If you requested a copy via mail, include a check or money order for your copy fee.

Conduct a Free Online Search

Thanks to the digitization of public records, there is now a much easier way to obtain a copy of a quitclaim deed. You no longer have to deal with your county clerk’s office in-person, over the phone, or online. Instead, you can simply conduct an online public record search. With an online search, you don’t have to wait in line to speak to a clerk, or sit in the waiting room while the clerk finds your document. You don’t have to mail in a check or money order for documents mailed to you. The entire process is done online in just minutes, from the comfort of your home.

A free online public records search will give you access to the quitclaim deed you’re looking for if you search for it using the right information. Type in the tax ID, property lot number, or the last name of the grantor or grantee. You can also search for the deed using just the property’s address on certain search forums. Your search will result in a list of all public documents relating to the property, including quitclaim deeds, property ownership, titles, land values, and the history of the property.

An online search can save you time and energy in the process of obtaining a copy of a quitclaim deed. Whether you’re a grantor, a grantee, a real estate agent, or another party, an online records search is the most efficient way to find what you’re seeking. Simply enter a few pieces of information, press “Search,” and get your hands on the exact document you need without delay. Try an online search today, and experience the difference yourself.

Property Lien Guide

Topics: Real Estate


Recent Posts

Landowner Rights in Conflict – The Issue of Forced Pooling

read more

Your Guide to a Successful Summer NAPE (2019)

read more

What Challenges Do Landmen Face on the Job?

read more